Mile High Apple Pie

This recipe is called Mile High Apple Pie because you'll think you're piling the raw apples a mile into the sky before you bake it, but rest assured they will shrink down to perfection when baked. A little sugar sprinkled on top of the pastry crust before baking will give it a nice crunchy texture and a shine on top. 

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Raw apples in a pie crust in a pie pan as one stage in Mile High Apple Pie.

The best pies have a perfect pastry crust. To see more about how to make the perfect pastry, click here where you’ll find a recipe and video to help you along.

Sprinkling sugar on top of Mile High Apple Pie before baking.

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Mile High Apple Pie

  • Prep Time: 20 m
  • Cook Time: 55 m
  • Resting Time: 30 m
  • Total Time: 1 h 15 m
  • Servings:
    8

Ingredients

  • Basic Pie Dough for a 2 9-inch circles
  • 9 cups peeled cored and sliced apples (about 3 pounds; ½-inch slices)
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar plus more for sprinkling on top
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or preferably freshly grated nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 4 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons butter cut into cubes
  • 1 egg lightly beaten

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 425 ̊F.
  2. Roll out the pastry circles on a floured surface until they are about ¼-inch thick. Place one circle of rolled out dough into the pie dish and gently press the dough into the edges of the dish. Trim the edges of the pastry and refrigerate the pie shell for 30 minutes. Place the other circle of dough in the refrigerator, either rolling it up in parchment paper or a silicone baking sheet.
  3. Combine the apples, sugars and spices in a large bowl and toss together. Let this sit and macerate for at least 30 minutes. Strain the apples through a colander into a bowl, reserving the liquid. Bring this liquid to a simmer in a small saucepan on the stove and reduce it almost by half.
  4. Toss the apples with the cornstarch and then return the reduced liquid to the mix. Transfer the apples to the pie dish with the rolled out pastry. Pile the apples high in the dish and dot the apples with the butter. Drape the remaining rolled out pastry circle over the top.
  5. Brush the lower edge of the pastry with water, and seal the top edge of the pastry down on the bottom edge. Once sealed together, trim the pastry around the dish. Make 5 or so slits or cut outs in the pastry to allow steam to escape during cooking. Brush the surface of the pie with the lightly beaten egg, and sprinkle the surface with sugar.
  6. Bake in the oven for 30 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350 ̊ F and continue to bake for another 20 to 25 minutes. If at any point the edges of the crust are getting too dark, cover the edges with aluminum foil. The pie is finished when nicely browned on top and the apples inside are tender and soft when pierced with a paring knife through one of the vent slits.
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Comments (5)Post a Reply

  1. Whenever I make an apple pie the apples shrink down and I’m left with a high crust and a layer of apples below. How do you prevent this. Is it the type of apple used?

    Thank you for your help.
    Rae

    1. Hi Rae, Apples will shrink down as they cook and crispy pastry will set in place, so not having a gap can be a challenge. I haven’t come across an apple that doesn’t shrink yet, but it’s possible that some might shrink less than others. I like to think of that gap as a place for me to spoon some cream or ice cream into. 😉

  2. I would love to know how to keep from having a void between the crust & the apples after baked. Thank you

    1. That’s tough, Renee. The apples will always shrink as they cook and if the pastry is crispy (which is how I like it), it will remain high. With a different pastry (perhaps one made with shortening, rather than butter), you might be able to minimize the gap.

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